Watch these boats catch some serious waves

These sailors feel the relentless power of the ocean on their face.
© Yann Riou/Dongfeng Race Team/Volvo Ocean Race
By Corinna Halloran

‘Sending it’ (verb): A term used in sailing when the (figurative) hand brake is released and the boat is sailing at full throttle. Boat speed is generally around 30+ knots (55+ kilometres per hour). ‘Sending it’ usually brings pure stoke to all sailors on board and their adrenaline levels are peaking at maximum.

When ‘sending it’ you experience the ocean on a whole new level. Especially as massive waves relentlessly catapult themselves over the bow of the boat and hit whatever is in their way with such an incredible force they will knock a 90 kg man off his feet. It can feel like you're getting punched in the face by the ocean over and over again.

When sailing through Mother Nature’s unyielding seas, Volvo Ocean Race sailors endure these types of waves not just for a few days. No, they get hit with wave after wave (after wave) for weeks on end as they sail for thousands of miles to the next port. No wonder the Volvo Ocean Race is considered one of the most extreme and toughest races on Earth.

Fortunately, sending it and hitting maximum speeds is everything offshore. So when the sailors are surfing down those waves, despite extreme exhaustion (after all getting punched in the face by Mother Ocean for weeks is tiring), there is nothing left but pure stoke.

Want to see more of what the ocean has to offer offshore? Check out nature deliver thousands of miles from land. Or, in total contrast to this video, the ocean can also be a desert.

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