5 moments that made MotoGP in 2016

What we'll always remember most from the 2016 MotoGP season, and why.
MotoGP_5moments_OpenerVinales
Did Vinales taking his first win crack our top 5? © Gold & Goose/Red Bull Content Pool
By Matthew Clayton

How good was MotoGP in 2016? So good that in coming up with the five moments we'll always remember from the season past, you could argue that an alternative five could easily fit the bill. In a season where we had nine different race winners, four first-time victors and more drama than we usually pack into five years, choosing what to leave out was no small task.

More MotoGP: The 16 pics of the '16 season

Our quest? To come up with the moments of the year that live longest in the memory once we turn the page on 2016. What memorable rides will we never forget? What clashes set tongues wagging and social media alight? Who delivered a performance that was truly from the top shelf?

Some of the shortlisted that didn't make the cut? Andrea Iannone breaking a near six-year victory drought for Ducati in Austria. Iannone taking out his teammate Andrea Dovizioso on the final lap when both were certain podium finishers in Argentina. The epic last-lap stoush between Jorge Lorenzo and Marc Marquez at Mugello. Maverick Vinales winning his maiden MotoGP race at Silverstone. Dovizioso winning for the first time in seven years and becoming the ninth different victor in 2016 at Sepang.

All worthy inclusions in any other year, but 2016 was clearly no ordinary season. The best of the best moments? These.

1. Miller's masterpiece

MotoGP_5moments_Miller
Miller shone on a sodden Sunday at Assen © Marc VDS Racing Team

Full disclosure: yes, us Aussies got a little bit excited about this one. Jack Miller's chances of winning the Dutch TT in June were 1000 to 1 because, well, the bookies had to give the Queenslander and every other rider who had next to no chance of winning at Assen something … Qualifying 18th on Saturday was no great shakes for the 21-year-old, but when the rain came down on race day, he was off like a shot, making up six places on the first lap and sitting in eighth place when the red flag was thrown after 15 of the scheduled 26 laps when the conditions became unrideable. "Tenth was the best I'd done in MotoGP before," he said afterwards, "and to improve on that in such tricky conditions and considering how far back I'd started, I was pretty content." Better was to come when the race re-started, Miller storming to fourth on the first lap, seeing Valentino Rossi crash in front of him, and then scything past Marquez into the lead of a MotoGP race for the first time – and with the longest eight laps of his life to negotiate to take the chequered flag ahead of the best in the world.

More MotoGP: Check out Jack Miller's exclusive column

After he managed that to become Australia's first race-winner since Casey Stoner won his home GP in 2012, his post-race interview ("I'm not an idiot, this sort of makes it clear I do know how to ride a motorbike"), podium shoey celebration and candour in the press conference ("If I went past myself, I would have said 'that dickhead is going to crash in two minutes'") endeared him to MotoGP fans the world over, not just those looking for footwear to pour drinks into in the wee hours Down Under. It's hard to imagine a less likely victory.

2. The Doctor's ill fortune 

Rossi couldn't convert his home pole into victory © Yamaha Motor Racing Srl

There was a time where Rossi simply owned Mugello – the Italian won his home Grand Prix seven years running between 2002-08 – but the last of those seven straight successes was his most recent win in the Tuscan hills before the 37-year-old took pole at Mugello in May, sending the packed stands into meltdown and ensuring a bumper crowd for race day. More than 100,000 yellow-clad Rossi devotees went bananas when Rossi and bitter rival Lorenzo went blow for blow over the opening nine laps, but it was then that Rossi's Yamaha engine cried 'enough', sending the home hero into a smoky retirement and causing an eerie hush to fall over the circuit. Rossi was desperately unlucky; Lorenzo's engine had failed in Sunday morning warm-up, but with a new powerplant for the race, he was able to fend Marquez off for the win as Rossi and his legion of fans were forced to watch and went home unhappy. Six rounds into the season, Rossi was already 37 points adrift of the championship lead, and never really recovered.

More MotoGP: Who were the best five riders of 2016?

3. A gift before glory

MotoGP_5moments_MarquezMotegi
Marquez was stunned to secure the title in Japan © Gold & Goose/Red Bull Content Pool

Marquez came to Japan with the 2016 championship a mathematical possibility, but with a 52-point lead over Rossi and a 66-point advantage over Lorenzo with 100 points to play for in the final four races, most expected the title fight to rumble on to Phillip Island the following weekend at the very least. Marquez needed to win and have Rossi finish 14th or lower – and Lorenzo finish off the podium – to clinch the crown on Honda's home soil, a trio of events that seemed unlikely in the extreme. Marquez took the lead on lap four and cleared off, but behind him, things got downright weird. Rossi crashed on lap seven to kill off his title hopes, but Lorenzo looked set to finish second before binning it with five laps to go, making Marquez the champion-elect. "I read on my pit board that Lorenzo was out – on that same lap I made mistakes in four or five corners, as it was difficult to stay focused," he admitted afterwards. The Spaniard regained his composure and brought it home for his third world title on a day few would have predicted – the last time both factory Yamahas had crashed out of the same race was the 2011 British Grand Prix, when neither Lorenzo nor Ben Spies made it to the end.

4. Cal can

MotoGP_5moments_CrutchlowBrno
Crutchlow snapped a lengthy British hoodoo © Michelin

His good mate Miller had won a race, while Iannone had stepped atop the podium for the first time at the Red Bull Ring for his former manufacturer, Ducati. But rather than lament his lot, Cal Crutchlow dug deep and ran rings around the rest of the field at Brno, taking the Czech Republic GP in difficult conditions to become the first British premier-class winner since Barry Sheene in 1981. The maiden win was in the 31-year-old's 98th start, and Crutchlow came from 10th on the grid and made his pre-race hard tyre gamble pay the ultimate dividend when he crossed the line seven seconds ahead of Rossi. "To even to be mentioned in the same sentence as Barry Sheene is something really nice," Crutchlow said afterwards. "I made the best tyre choice on the grid, I was playing with them (his rivals). I had so much grip compared to the other guys that had not had the same tyre choice as me. I was cruising around." The win was not only Crutchlow's first – it was the maiden success for the independent LCR Honda outfit and team boss Lucio Cecchinello.

5. Home and dry

MotoGP_5moments_MarquezGermany
Marquez timed his switch to perfection in Germany © Gold & Goose/Red Bull Content Pool

If there was ever a year for Marquez's dominance at the Sachsenring to come to an end, 2016 was it. The Spaniard had won every race in every class he'd competed in at the undulating German circuit since 2010, but rain in the minutes before this year's race meant wet tyres were the only sensible choice – but would need to be discarded for dryer rubber as the skies inevitably cleared. Some riders pitted and went for intermediates, while Marquez nearly crashed on lap 11 and tumbled to eighth. He then rolled the dice on lap 17, pitting and going straight to slick tyres, aiming to stay within the thin dry line that was emerging around the Sachsenring sweeps. From 14th place with 13 laps left, Marquez immediately started hacking five seconds a lap off the race leaders, proof that he'd timed his switch to perfection. By lap 25 he was in the lead, and he ended up finishing nearly 10 seconds ahead of second-placed Crutchlow for his seventh straight Sachsenring success. With Rossi back in eighth and Lorenzo having a nightmare and finishing 15th, Marquez extended his series lead to 48 points at the mid-point of the year – and his third world title was as good as in the bag.

read more about
Next Story