Storm surfers ©6ixtyfootfilms ©6ixtyfootfilms

The epic tale of two friends and their life-long search to ride the world’s biggest waves, Storm Surfers 3D is a stunning achievement in action documentary making. As we build up to the Australian theatrical premiere on August 14, let’s break the ambitious project down to its numerical parts.

2...
Storm Surfers 3D follows two best friends - Aussie tow-surfing legend Ross Clarke-Jones and his fellow countryman two-time world champion Tom Carroll - on their quest to hunt down and ride the biggest and most dangerous waves in Australia. Now both well into their 40s, these two larger-than-life characters were born out of the 1980s generation of pro-surfing and live to ride waves the size of buildings. Storm Surfers 3D follows them on that mission.

 

5'6"...
During Tom Carroll’s 14-year tenure on the world tour, he racked up 26 victories (placing third best ever behind Tom Curren and Kelly Slater) and finished in the top five a record nine times. The first ever 'goofyfoot' to earn a professional world title, the 5’6” Carroll was without equal, proving the old maxim: “it’s not the size of the dog in the fight; it’s the size of the fight in the dog”.

 

90 feet...
Ross Clarke-Jones’ love of big waves led him to become one of the first to ride a jet ski out to the largest breaks and pioneer the new sport of tow-surfing. He is world renowned for his fearless-to-the-point-of-psycho approach to big wave surfing. “I don’t know what happened when he was a kid. He must have had a stressful situation in his household,” theorises six-time world champion Kelly Slater about Ross’ approach to mammoth waves. Ross still rates the ‘Biggest Wednesday’ at Jaws, Hawaii, in 1998 as the largest waves he’s ever seen. “That day had calculated waves of 45 feet, which works out to about 90 foot faces,” he said. “That’s still the biggest day I’ve seen, and ridden.”

 
 

75...
In Storm Surfers 3D, Tom and Ross embark on an expedition of a lifetime after a fellow big wave surfer from Western Australia reveals the location of a mythical wave 75 kilometres out to sea. Named Turtle Dove Shoal, this legendary breaker has never been surfed and could possibly hold the biggest, most dangerous wave in Australia.

 

17,000...
In their mission to find the biggest waves, Tom and Ross charged surf-forecasting guru and meteorologist Ben Matson to track the giant oceanic storms that create massive swells. The hunt took the team to some of the most exotic and remote reaches on the planet and they travelled more than 17,000 kilometres on seven missions over four months.

 

3D...
The Storm Surfers feature film and television series have been shot entirely in 3D. The team captured stunning, world-first 3D footage at breaks around Australia and Hawaii, riding never-before-surfed waves at some of the planet’s most remote and forbidding locations, all the while using yet-to-be invented camera technology. 

nullStorm Surfers 3D

 

2005...
Storm Surfers 3D is the culmination of more than six years work. Co-directors Chris Nelius and Justin McMillan first teamed-up in 2005 to shoot The Sixth Element, a biopic about Ross Clarke-Jones, and the trio were drawn together by their mutual passion for surfing and adventure. When Tom Carroll and Ben Matson joined the team on their mission to Japan the essential concept for the future Storm Surfers 3D was realised.

 

1.35 million...
Riding the world’s biggest and most dangerous waves wasn’t the biggest challenge of making Storm Surfers 3D. There were also some extraordinary feats of logistics required to capture the action in the highest possible definition. Among the great innovations was the creation of unique, world-first camera rigs to house the 26 3D cameras used on the shoot, along with myriad devices to keep water off the lenses. What’s more, the Storm Surfers crew developed entirely new post-production techniques to process the 1,500 hours of footage – that equates to 135 million frames of footage all in perfect 3D!


Want more?


Comments

    Add a comment

    * All fields required
    Only 2000 Characters are allowed to enter :
    Type the word on the left, then click "Post Comment":

    Article Details