5 Boro Goes East: Part Three

The notorious skateboarding crew from NYC finally reaches the most eastern point in North America.

© Sam McGuire

Red Bull's own Sam McGuire has been along for the ride the entire trip, documenting the goods along the way.

Here's the third and final part to the trip as told through Sam's eyes.

We woke up to see the sunrise over Sydney Harbour in northern Nova Scotia. It was a picture postcard day, not a cloud in the sky as we boarded the ferry and set sail to finally set foot in Channel-Port aux Basques, Newfoundland five hours later.

It’s a good eight-hour drive across the island, where the landscape and the accents kept us entertained the whole way.

Newfoundland was one of the first areas settled by England in North America, so the accent is an eclectic mix of a few different areas blended into one and is one of the more unique accents I’ve ever heard.

The next few days we lucked out with some amazing weather and we spent them exploring the beautiful city and skating the spots we could find.

Silvester Eduardo, Frontside Shove It
Silvester Eduardo, Frontside Shove It© Sam McGuire

After climbing through some scenic hills along the eastern coast of St. John’s, there are these two slabs of cement that make for a really cool gap along the shorefront. Turns out that it’s also the most eastern skate spot in North America. Silvester Eduardo, aka ‘El Doogie’, felt the scenic inspiration with this equally scenic frontside shove it.

Rob Gonyon, Backside 180
Rob Gonyon, Backside 180© Sam McGuire

This backside 180 is insane! We spotted this rail driving around downtown and Rob Gonyon started rolling at it and then one of the tries just threw out a backside 180 and nearly landed it first go. A few harsh slams later he was victorious bombing down the hill towards the bay.

After a few days of skating in St. John’s we had to pack it up and head back to catch the ferry back to the mainland to start the long drive home back to the Big Apple.