A.Girl
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Music

First listen: A.GIRL brings her A game on the brooding R&B cut Play

The Sydney artist is in some type of zone.
By Red Bull Australia
4 min readPublished on
Arriving on the scene with the emotive track 2142, A.GIRL made an impact with a style that evokes classic R&B-pop with a distinctive contemporary edge.
It's a style that's further explored on the new track Play, premiering today on RedBull.com Play leans further into experimental territory with booming sub-bass anchoring rich melody.
Listen to Play, and read our feature interview with A.GIRL, below.
Red Bull: You’ve repped 2142 on your previous single – it’s there in the song, but can you explain further how the area has shaped your art?
A.GIRL: The area itself has shaped me into a tough-skin type of girl. I love that it has taught me life lessons and exposed me to both the good and bad. It can turn at any point so you have to keep pushing to make sure to ride that wave of goodness for as long as you can. As my area has shaped me as a person, it makes its way through to every aspect of my music – when I’m writing, choosing what type of sounds I want in my production and when networking and meeting new people in the industry. I know that sometimes there can be a bit of a culture shock, I think mainly because I’m very raw, real and strong, qualities that 2142 has taught me.
There are aesthetic and sonic throwbacks to the ‘90s. Take us through your discovery of music of that era.
I was born in the 21st century (legit by six days) but my Mumma raised me listening to essentials from the 90’s. The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, Destiny’s Child, Brandy, MC Lyte, TLC, Toni Braxton, Terrence Trent D’Arby, D’Angelo, 2pac and Bob Marley just to name a few. I could go on forever, but that era of music has a unique quality you can’t quite get from music nowadays. The '90s was definitely a good time to be alive in music.
After making a statement with 2142, how do you feel Play expands your focus?
I always had a vision to start my music releases with a song about where I grew up, to ground me, hence 2142. The attitude that regardless of the post code you grew up in there are no limitations on where you can go and what type of music you can create, has always been important to me. With Play I’m expanding the focus to a more universal theme that isn’t bound by geography – only by the limits of your imagination. This is more intimate, sexier and as the title suggests more playful. Being a nineteen-year-old female transitioning from a girl to a woman, having fun with this time of life is definitely something others can relate to. Like a lot of young people, I’m sometimes shy and awkward until you get to know me. Then I like to play.
Play has an impactful hook. When did you discover your strong sense of melody?
Honestly, I’ve just been singing for so long that I feel I have a large folder in the back of my head full of potential melodies. I hear it before I’m even able to sing it and sometimes its hella frustrating because too much of anything isn’t good. When there are too many melodies floating around, you tend to lose that golden one and that’s why voice memos are always a good idea when in a recording session.
There’s been a lot happening with R&B overseas and locally this decade. How have you approached establishing yourself in the genre?
Establishing myself as an R&B artist has been a really cool experience. Honestly, what I keep trying to remind myself is to just stay true to my sound and myself and not to get caught up in riding a trend. I think what makes a memorable artist is someone that makes their own lane and stays true to everything they are but isn’t afraid to experiment and push boundaries.
What are your goals and aspirations for the remainder of the year and beyond?
The goals for the rest of the year is to keep releasing songs along with visuals, write as much as I can, spend quality time with myself, family and friends and focus on being more active and healthier.
Some career goals are to be on triple j like a version, tour overseas and to meet and write with The Weeknd, which would be the absolute cherry on top.