Kite with a view of St. Michael’s Mount
© VisitBritain/Ben Selway/Getty Images
Kitesurfing

10 of the best UK kitesurfing spots

You don’t have to fly across the world to find some decent kitesurfing spots, they are right here in the UK.
Written by Georgina Wilson-Powell
5 min readPublished on
Whether the last time you flew a kite was when you were a child or you’re a full-on kitesurfing addict, the UK is blessed with some of the best beaches in the world for this adrenaline-pumping sport. Here are 10 of the best kitesurfing spots in the UK...

1. St Ives Bay, Cornwall 

Taking on the waves at St Ives Bay
Taking on the waves at St Ives Bay
Selling point: Great for all weather
Three miles of golden sand stand ready for your board. British Kitesurfing Wave Champion Lee Pasty recommends Gwithian to the north of St Ives Bay for wave sailing. While Bluff at the southern end has "an amazing flat-water spot and, when there are big swells, some of our best waves.”
Pro tip:
"My home of West Cornwall is the best place for kitesurfing in the UK," says Pasty. "The fact that the north and south coast is separated by a 15-minute drive means that we have a wide variety of spots for all conditions."
Try it yourself: Pasty Adventures and Elevate Kite School both operate in the area.

2. New Hunstanton, Norfolk

Head to Old Hunstanton when the tide comes in
Head to Old Hunstanton when the tide comes in
Selling point: Good for low tides
This is where the 2015 British Kitesurfing Championships were held. If it’s good enough for the pros, it’s probably good enough for you.
Pro tip:
While New Hunstanton beach is perfect for low tides, head round to Old Hunstanton when the tide comes back in.
Try it yourself:
Hunstanton Watersports offers kiting, standup paddleboarding and windsurfing lessons.

3. Marazion, Cornwall

Kite with a view of St. Michael’s Mount
Kite with a view of St. Michael’s Mount
Selling point: Winter waves
With its great waves and stunning backdrop of St Michael's Mount, Marazion is one of the best places to kitesurf in the winter. After heavy storms large amounts of seaweed can get washed up on this private beach so be careful it doesn't get caught in your kite.
Pro tip:
Be sure not to kitesurf here two hours either side of high tide as the top of the beach is close to a railway track and any accidents involving a kite on the tracks may end up in a ban.
Try it yourself:
Pasty Adventures and Ocean High offer lessons.

4. Troon, Scotland

Another kitesurfing lesson in progress on Troon beach
Another kitesurfing lesson in progress on Troon beach
Selling point: Great for beginners
Troon, on the west coast of Scotland, is an ideal spot for beginners, providing flatter water for learning tricks. There are large areas to launch from and to land in, as well as relatively small waves and flat water lagoons, despite being only 15 minutes from Europe’s largest wind farm.
Pro tip:
South-west winds create the best waves. A local reef, 150 metres off the south beach, offers an easy ride for beginners.
Try it yourself:
Kitesurf Scotland operate on the beach.

5. Lancing Beach, Brighton

Take to the skies at Lancing Beach
Take to the skies at Lancing Beach
Selling point: Sociable kiting
The south coast’s best spot is also home to the Brighton Kitesurf and SUP Academy who hold regular events and championships. With cheap all day parking and a huge beachside restaurant, you can see why Lancing Beach is one of the most sociable sites on the coast. The beach is also the perfect spot for beginners with its low tides and gentle, small waves.
Pro tip:
"The conditions are unique as we get great sea-breezes caused by the location of the South Downs to the north," says Frazer Stewart, senior instructor at Brighton Kitesurf and SUP Academy. "The sandy beach gently shelves and the waves are small. This makes the conditions superb for learning and also for improving your skills.”
Try it yourself:

6. East Beach, Southend-on-Sea

A dramatic sunset at high tide at East Beach
A dramatic sunset at high tide at East Beach
Selling point: Strong community feel
While East Beach is popular for everyone from tourists to surfers, there’s a strong kitesurfing community here. There's a school and rental shop on the beach, while a designated launching and landing point is located between the boom and the slipway.
Pro tip:
Avoid riding at high tide and 90 minutes either side unless you’re proficient. The beach can be used with anything from an north-easterly wind to a south-westerly.
Try it yourself:

7. St Anne’s Beach, Blackpool

Blackpool – more than just the Pleasure Beach
Blackpool – more than just the Pleasure Beach
Selling point: Advanced riding
For those who want to meet other kitesurfers, St Anne’s is always popular. It’s best for those who are more advanced and who want to learn new tricks, so beginners might find themselves drinking a lot of seawater!
Pro tip:
For bigger waves, head round to Starr Point, although it’s best to leave this to the more experienced riders
Try it yourself:
Contact Blackpool Light Club for more information on kiting lessons.

8. Rhosneigr, Anglesey

Rhosneigr, one of Wales' best kept secrets for kitesurfing
Rhosneigr, one of Wales' best kept secrets for kitesurfing
Selling point: Incredible views
With the dramatic backdrop of Snowdonia, this is a great spot once you get going and works best with a southerly wind. The northern bay is better for kitesurfers, while the southern one attracts surfers. There’s a kitesurf shop here too.
Pro tip:
“Rhosneiger in North Wales is a particular favourite of ours,” says Marc Rowley, British Wave Masters Champion. "It's a very windy part of the UK, the beach is big so there’s plenty of room and the views of Snowdonia are awesome!”
Try it yourself:
Pro Kitesurfing and Kiteboarding Lessons offer lessons in Anglesey.

9. Pendine, Carmarthenshire

Selling point: Beginner friendly
One of the UK’s most famous long sand beaches can be found at Pendine. While it's often used for land speed record attempts, it's also perfect for beginner kitesurfers as the water is shallow for the first 30 metres.
Pro tip:
Avoid launching here at high tide – there isn't any beach left!
Try it yourself:
The Big Blue Experience offer kiting lessons in Pembrokeshire.

10. Porthcrawl, South Wales

Enjoy the swell, Porthcrawl, South Wales
Enjoy the swell, Porthcrawl, South Wales
Selling point: Best point-breaks
Kiting schools here take advantage of one of the best point-breaks in the country. It’s a popular spot most weekends with a flat sandy beach while another spot, Rest Bay, is nearby.
Pro tip:
Mark Rowley, British Wave Masters Champion, says: "South Wales has beaches that are suitable on most wind/swell directions. The best spots, though, are those that offer large, safe, sandy beaches, which Wales has in abundance.”
Try it yourself:
Blast Kiteboarding School offers lessons in Porthcawl and surrounding areas.