This amazing real-life Iron Man suit really flies

Meet Richard M. Browning, the ex-soldier who's created an amazing working jetpack.

What's it like to fly in a real-life Iron Man suit? According to the inventor of this incredible working prototype, it's "like riding a bicycle in three dimensions".

It's like riding a bike in three dimensions.Richard M. Browning, real-life Iron Man

The man in the suit is Richard M. Browning, an ex-Royal Marine reservist who is, "inspired by doing things that haven't been done".

38-year-old Browning has developed the suit in his garage in Salisbury over the past 10 months. He's named it after the Greek mythological figure Daedalus, the father of Icarus. 

What can you achieve combining body, mind and technology?Richard M. Browning

Propulsion comes from six miniature jet engines  – similar to those used in jet-powered model aeroplanes – which are mounted on the arms and the lower back. Though the suit is capable of extreme speeds and altitudes, Browning is currently exercising a bit of restraint.

"The suit can fly in most locations," he tells RedBull.com. "Despite being capable of flying at several hundred miles per hour, and at thousands of feet, normal operation sees the wearer flying at no more than a couple of metres."

We guess it's true what they say; with great power comes great responsibility. (Even if that is from Spider-Man, not Iron Man.)

Training to fly the suit is really tough

Flying like Tony Stark is not as simple as just strapping yourself in and jetting off. The suit requires an enormous amount of physical effort to control.

Even for Browning – a dedicated triathlete, ultra-marathon runner and endurance canoeist – the suit tests the limits of personal fitness. He describes the strength required to direct the jets as "severe". In order to fly, he must follow a strenuous workout regime; in a typical week's training he cycles over 150km and does three intensive calisthenics sessions. He also runs 40km every Saturday morning, starting at 2am.