Skateboarding

Jake Wooten brings a mobile skatepark to Nashville neighborhoods

© Robby Klein
Pro skateboarder and Tennessee-native Jake Wooten returned home to up the ante on the 2020 drive-by trend.
By Red Bull Editorial TeamPublished on
There’s nothing quite like being able to give back to your hometown. That is exactly what professional skateboarder Jake Wooten did with a mobile skatepark when he went back home to visit Nashville.
Jake, along with some of his hometown friends at Sixth Avenue Skatepark, recently loaded up the Red Bull vehicle and literally brought their mobile skatepark to skaters around Nashville. “The mobile skatepark idea came up as a result of the COVID guidelines being placed,” the 20--year-old told us. “We decided that if we aren’t able to go to the skateparks and have the same communal atmosphere we used to have, then why not bring the skatepark to people and bring that good energy to people’s homes?”
Jake Wooten
Jake Wooten
They had 30-minute jam sessions complete with rails and ramps at four different location stops. Jake and his friends spent some time in Antioch, Bellevue, Madison, and Franklin.
Jake grew up north of Nashville, in a town called Gallatin. “I grew up skating in Gallatin Skatepark a ton, it was probably my favorite park,” he said. It was there where he sharpened his skills that earned him first place at the Vans Park Series in 2018. “It’s an amazing community [Gallatin]. However, with that being said there’s less opportunity for things such as skateboarding. It makes it harder to see it as a career.” This was partly what inspired Jake to return home and deliver the gift of skate directly to the front step of the ever-growing-skate community.
Jake Wooten
Jake Wooten
“It felt so good to bring some fun and normalcy to these Nashville skaters,” Jake shared. “It was great to see all my friends who I haven’t been able to visit since all of this started.”
The year 2020 brought change to a lot of things. “We definitely had to skate in different ways this year,” said Jake. “Personally, I had to transition from skating bigger ramps. When the parks closed, I started skating more rails and flat ground/street. Also being able to have time to focus on individual tricks and progression versus constantly going to contests. It made me feel more comfortable trying new things without as much risk of getting hurt, which could potentially take you out of future contests.”
Jake Wooten
Jake Wooten
This year’s break in competition hasn’t been ideal for Jake or any of his peers in the skateboarding world, but being able to bring some joy to Nashville made this home visit extra special.