Jordy Smith's surfboards for J-Bay
© Tyrone Bradley / Red Bull Content Pool
Surfing

A Look Inside Jordy Smith's 3-Board J-Bay Quiver

The world's best surfers are busy prepping for the Corona Open JBay. We sat down with the South African favourite and talked through the equipment needed for the world's best right-hand pointbreak.
Written by Craig Jarvis
3 min readPublished on
The hallowed 'Supertubes' in Jeffreys Bay (home to the upcoming Corona Open JBay) is a unique wave. On the upper echelon of surfing performance, it requires some special equipment to have it under control. Three hundred meters of runway-speed wall and enough sections for barrels, huge carves and airs will need something unique. It is also a wave that requires huge amounts of paddling. Catch a bomb up near the top gully and surf to impossibles on a big day, and you have a serious distance to cover to get back for your second wave. In a 40-minute heat, a little extra board for paddling could also help. It is one of the locations on the Tour that needs some very specialised equipment.
Jordy Smith has some secret sauce in his boards that help him to get the job done. It is working with two event wins and a twenty-point heat under the belt. Is it complicated, though? Not really. Some fairly straightforward surfboard dimensions, a little bit of something here, and a touch of something else there.
Early morning rail work

Early morning rail work

© Craig Kolesky / Red Bull Content Pool

Time for the big contest, Three boards for J-Bay. Is that enough?
Yes, it will probably be a three-board quiver for J-Bay this season. My smallest board for Supers is a 6'1 x 19 1/8 swallow tail. It is 2 5/8 thick and has a slightly flatter tail. It also has a bit more nose rocker in case the surf is in the one to three-foot range and ruffling along the reef.
Those conditions are challenging at Supers. Got to get your speed up.
So, yes, you need to get up and go fast. Those conditions zipper along the reef and you're not necessarily coming back and doing too many wraps when the conditions are like that. It's more about the speed, hits and down-the-line moves, floats and layback-finish turns because the wave moves a lot faster when it is like that. You need to keep up with it all the way.
Jordy Smith's surfboards for J-Bay

Jordy Smith's surfboards for J-Bay

© Tyrone Bradley / Red Bull Content Pool

Then when the waves are good? How do you change it up?
So, my second board would be my middle-range board, definitely. It's my standard short board with quite a bit of nose and tail rocker. It comes in at 6'2 x 19 1/8 x 2 5/8 with a rounded squash tail. This board would be for most conditions at Supers between two to five-foot. Your regular day at Supers when it's not running along the rocks and it's not big and chunky. That's when Supers is at its best, pretty much.
Then you get big and chunky Supers. Windy, offshore, sometimes some long sections. What happens, then?
Well, from six to eight-foot, I'll have a little bit more board underfoot. It'll either be a rounded pin or a swallowtail. I'm playing around a bit with that board at the moment. I need something that really holds well and draws out big arcs. It also has a little bit of edge further forward than my standard boards for the Supers barrels.
Carrying down-the-line speed through the turn

Carrying down-the-line speed through the turn

© Craig Kolesky / Red Bull Content Pool

Part of this story

Jordy Smith

A powerful regular-footer from Durban in South Africa, Jordy Smith is a regular winner on the World Surf League Championship Tour.

South AfricaSouth Africa
View Profile